Top 5 Career Choices for Working with the Environment

It is an exciting—and highly challenging—time to work in the fields of environmental study, and, luckily, there are several options available to those interested. Check out these lucrative and intellectually-stimulating positions below. Those who decide to work with the environment will enjoy a comfortable life in their highly redeeming work.

Environmental Engineer

There is a wide range of possible work for environmental engineers. Whether creating models, methods or products, their efforts are always directed at preventing environmental damage. Environmental engineers are often found in government positions or private firms, but there are opportunities for self-employment, as well. In May 2010, the mean annual wage for environmental engineers was reported as $78,740. Keep in mind that federal government jobs will pay significantly more than state government jobs. These positions generally require a master’s degree, but a bachelor’s is okay for entry-level positions.

Conservation Biologist

It is an exciting time to be a conservation biologist, now that funding for Research and Development is increasing for environmentally-conscious business models in various ecosystems. This is a wonderful career choice for those with an intense passion for preserving the earth’s natural states while promoting sustainable methods of work and industrial development, and there are several position options available. Conservation biologists have opportunities to teach, as well as research and work the field for nonprofit organizations, government agencies and privately-owned companies. Consider a degree in interdisciplinary studies, focusing on biology, resource management and/or economics.

Urban Planner

For those who like the idea of improving public transportation, highways, widespread green energy and promoting each individual’s accountability for the earth, urban planning is a fantastic option. As natural disasters increase in frequency, urban planning will become even more important in years to come—planning for and preventing floods, hurricanes and heat waves, for example, will be imperative both now and in the future. Urban planners will need at least an undergraduate degree or graduate degree in an urban planning program. Certification is acquired through the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP). While this is not required, it does inspire confidence in potential clients.

Energy Efficiency Builder

Energy efficiency builders are similar to urban planners, except that they focus on the green aspects of specific buildings, as opposed to widespread urban areas. Because professional buildings are notoriously inefficient, and the possibility of reducing inefficient energy use anywhere from %75 to %95 (as seen in Germany, for example), energy efficiency builders are essential to cultivating a greener, more eco-conscious business world. Opportunities for employment mostly lie in architecture and engineering. These positions often require five-year bachelor degrees, and often a master’s.

Environmental Consultant

Environmental consulting is growing in importance in the US, making these positions some of the highest-paying in any profession. Jobs are highly specialized, often requiring a master’s degree in an appropriate field of study. Duties include advising clients on how to control any pollution or contaminated sites, and how to further comply with environmental regulations in the present and future. Other possible environmental factors to control include energy efficiency, flood prevention and asbestos management, just to name a few. Project managers can make $60,000 a year on average.

Promoting energy efficiency, conservation, and all-around sustainable practices are great ways to spend time, especially if a fair wage is involved. Environmentally-focused jobs are not only good-paying, but they are also wildly available in several fields, and the opportunities for even more jobs are growing steadily. Look into the options at hand and seriously consider one of these fulfilling careers.

Top 5 Career Choices for Working with Animals

If working with animals seems appealing, there are so many career choices at hand that the number of options can seem overwhelming at times. However, this is a great problem to have. Check out these five great career choices for any animal lover, and see which combination of salary, education requirements and job specifications is most appropriate.

Veterinarian

Veterinarians have a wonderful opportunity to assist people in need of healthcare for their household pets. They work closely with both animals and owners to diagnose and treat any pet health problems. The competition is tough in veterinary school, so be prepared to work! If science, studying, problem-solving and hard work with frequent alone time seems appealing, becoming a veterinarian may be the right career choice. Vets make around $54,000 per year on average.

Dog Trainer

Professional dog trainers specialize in motivating dogs in a manner that will encourage discipline and good behavior. While obedience school is where many dog trainers find work, there are many trainers who work with dogs toward more complicated tricks, as well. Salary varies greatly with this career; while entry-level training jobs often feature a very low wage, those with more experience can make anywhere between $25,000 and $50,000 a year. Additionally, those who manage to run their own training business have the unique opportunity to set their own prices and earn even more each year.

Animal Therapist

These rehabilitation specialists work with animals in need of targeted care and attention. If the thought of tending to an injured animal to help improve their mobility and quality of life is an attractive one, look into getting licensed for animal therapy. Patience is essential, both for the work itself and the required education; this career requires a Master’s in Physical Therapy (for animals). The earning potential for animal therapists is significant; while starting salaries range between $29,000 and $31,000 per year, those with more experience can make upwards of $36,000 per year.

Zoologist

When a love of animals is coupled with a love of studying their environments, zoology makes a great career choice. Working outdoors and studying earth preservation are absolutely required for this line of work, especially in order to fight the planet’s growing number of endangered species. Zoology also requires several years of advanced education that usually involves specializing in one particular animal species, so expect to be in school for as long as ten years. While experienced zoologists are known to make anywhere between $35,000 and $75,000 a year, those employed by the federal government actually made $117,000 in March 2009 (on average).

Wildlife Rehabilitators

Like zoology, wildlife rehabilitation is another great career choice for those who love to work with animals while outdoors. There are several unromantic aspects to helping animals transition back into their natural environments after a particular disaster or illness, and wildlife rehabilitation sees all of these details quite often. Rehabilitators will clean and bandage animals, feed them, clean cages and/or help with transporting them to and from their natural environments. A degree is not required to become a wildlife rehabilitator, and, unfortunately, the salaries often reflect that. However, $30,000 per year plus benefits is a possibility.

While salary is important to anyone researching possible career choices, those with a love of animals know that this is not a career to choose for the paychecks. That said, there are plenty of feasible options available for any animal lover. The salary range above should help give some idea of what’s available, exciting and rewarding.

Top 5 Career Choices for Technological Advancement

The field of technological advancement is constantly changing, and the need for qualified specialists and engineers is always present. Check out these five different types of engineering; each is unique in its concentration, but the focus of advancing technology is the backbone of every one.

Electronic Engineering

Electronic engineering is a fascinating and challenging field of study, covering a wide array of possible concentrations within technological advancement that include analog, digital, consumer and power electronics. Electric power control, robotics and computer engineering are other potential focuses, among many others. This type of engineering requires a bachelor’s degree in Engineering, Science or Technology (generally), and some choose to continue on for a higher degree. Jobs are available, however, without a master’s. Expect to earn around $65,000 per year.

Chemical Engineering

Chemical engineers work to transform raw materials or chemicals into new, useful materials. Large-scale manufacture work should be expected, as designing and constructing plants is a large part of most chemical engineers’ jobs. Ensuring safe and economically-viable practices is essential, but there are opportunities in university research in addition to field work. As with electronic engineering, an undergraduate degree is essential, and many choose to study further. Chemical engineers earn around $61,000-$62,000 on average each year.

Biomedical Engineering

For those with an interest in technological advancement paired with a love of health sciences, biomedical engineering may be the perfect fit. These engineers work toward developing new procedures and devices, always focused on improving health practice and safety. A specialty in biomedical training is a must, in conjunction with an engineering degree. There are several opportunities for biomedical engineering positions right now, but the need for more is expected to grow significantly in upcoming years. An average income of $77,000 per year can be expected.

Environmental Engineering

This is a great career choice for those who are looking to couple a passionate eco-consciousness with their interest in technological advancement. Those who are looking to study biology or chemistry as an undergraduate can look forward to working on pollution, recycling, public health and waste problems. Creating models and sustainable methods or products is important to this field of study, as well. Expect to work toward an undergraduate degree, as well as some intern work afterwards. In May 2010, the mean annual wage for environmental engineers was $78,740.

Mechanical Engineering

This field of technological advancement is linked closely with various areas of physics such as kinematics, thermodynamics and structural analysis. Mechanical engineers use this knowledge to develop and improve manufacturing plants, industrial equipment and machinery, electric generators, internal combustion engines, heating and cooling systems and much more. Undergraduate students majoring in mechanical engineering can expect to work one or two internships during their education. Professionals earn between $60,000 and $73,000 per year on average.

There are tons of exciting opportunities in the area of technological advancement, and the future is sure to hold far more chances for development. Committing to such a progressive field is sure to allow for a challenging, consistently moving and rewarding life. Research what engineering opportunities are available, and get studying!

Choosing the Right Classes for Your Career

When the time comes to choose the right classes for your career, the numerous options available may be nothing short of overwhelming. However, with some patient thinking and active research, the right classes will reveal themselves, and you can enjoy the challenging academic experiences that lie ahead.

Choose Your Strengths

When choosing which classes to take for your career, this will often involve thinking back to which classes you’ve performed the best in throughout your academic life. This will often point directly toward a possible major, but if not, don’t worry. This realization will happen on its own. Ask yourself what you find enjoyable on a daily basis, and which academic skills you’d like to improve over a longer period of time. If still confused, consider taking the Stamford Test, which is a brief questionnaire that is helpful to some students when deciding what career path to choose.

Research Professors and Courses

When investigating a course catalogue, one of the most helpful ways to choose a specific class or professor is by seeing what other students had to say about them. RateMyProfessors.com is perfect for this. It lists professors by university, and publishes various students’ ratings and reviews of the professors and the courses they teach. This is extremely helpful when choosing between one course and another, as this usually means choosing between the teaching methods of the professors at hand. RateMyProfessors.com lists quality, easiness, helpfulness, clarity and rater interest in their rating system, allowing for more specificity and, thus, ease in deciding.

Try Word of Mouth

Online research is important when choosing the right classes for your career, but nothing will beat speaking with students directly. Ask around campus to get detailed accounts of a full semester’s worth of work. Each student has different tastes, of course, but most tend to agree on professors’ abilities to relay information in clear, understandable and stimulating ways, which is most important. Talk to students who are in your field of interest; preferably those a bit older—they will be able to describe the ways in which their classes have furthered the development of their careers.

Consider Combination Courses

Often students find themselves interested in more than one subject, despite a solidified career choice. School presents the perfect opportunity to take advantage of these varying interests, as many institutions offer combination courses that will pertain to complementary fields of study. Talk to an academic advisor and see which combination courses are available for your major. English literature and psychology is a common pairing, for example. The science of emotions is another type of course that is gaining in popularity. The more interests you follow, the more you’ll have to offer in your career when the time comes to start work.

While there is always a fear of veering off the correct path when preparing for your lifelong career, it is important to keep in mind that, in education, there are very few instances of real mistakes. As long as you are honest about what truly interests you and can follow those interests with dedication, the classes that might have felt unrelated before may suddenly become intricately related to your career. Think it over, ask around and—most importantly—enjoy your academic experience!

Top 5 Career Choices for Working with Children

Working with children is an extremely rewarding path to choose for a career. Whether working with several children at a time or on an individual basis is more suitable, there are several options at hand for those who love children and are interested in their fascinating and curious minds.

Teacher

Who doesn’t remember their favorite teachers throughout life? While being a teacher presents numerous challenges on a daily basis, embracing the ability to help shape a child’s education and sense of order is one of the most applauded and rewarding career choices. Whether teaching happens in the classroom—for preschool, grade school, special education, etc.—or in a one-to-one setting—as in tutoring or homeschooling—teaching will enliven both students and teachers themselves. Keep in mind that a Masters in Education is often required (with some exceptions), and salaries vary greatly from different institutions.

Speech Pathologist

This is a great career choice for those who desire close and careful work with children. Speech pathologists work with patients directly to improve any speech impediments like stuttering, lisps or slow language development, and patients are often small children. This is another career choice that involves a significant amount of training beforehand. Speech pathologists must obtain both undergraduate and graduate degrees, as well as a few years of training after the graduate degree has been obtained. However, they will also enjoy a comfortable life making between $50,000 and $70,000 a year.

Pediatrician

Pediatrics is another career choice requiring a good amount of formal education. Expect to work for about ten years before enjoying actual practice with children. If the medical field seems attractive, however, look seriously into becoming either a pediatric doctor or nurse, as this is another very redeeming career choice for those interested in working with children. Not only will families turn to pediatricians for guidance, but pediatricians are able to watch the health of children improve in response to their efforts. Average salaries run between $100,000 and $150,000 a year.

Child Psychologist

If using play, toys, and interactive questions in order to help children be more vocal about their thoughts seems appealing, consider child psychology as a career choice. This is another great option for working one-on-one with children. The way children react to and answer various types of questions and stimulations helps to hint at what may or may not be bothering them. If that sounds interesting, seriously consider this career choice. Child psychologists often work for schools, and many become successful enough to start their own private practice. Last year, child psychologists made anywhere from $39,000 to $110,000.

Child Care

If the hefty training required for the above careers is not feasible or attractive, consider working for a child care facility instead. These are great positions for those who enjoy working with several children for hours at a time, usually in a day care setting for children with working parents. Child care employees will enjoy working with children of all different ages and backgrounds. Nannies and aupairs can expect to make around $20,000 a year, while a higher-level position such as the director of a child care center will make around $35,000 a year.

Obviously, more training is required of some of these career choices than others. However, each option listed above is a great opportunity to enjoy the wonderful minds of children, and each is deeply rewarding in its unique ways. Choose what seems most enriching, and the families of these children will be thankful for it.

How to Improve Your Memory for Tests

It is often said that “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks.” However, when it comes to the brain, scientists are finding that just the opposite is true: the brain can adapt and change to new situations. The flexibility of the brain to change and adjust to changing situations holds true when it comes to improving memory.

Tip #1: Don’t Lose Exercise or Sleep

More than an old routine, exercise is necessary to help the mind retain information by preventing the body from facing illnesses such as diabetes (which drains memory). Also, sleep is vital to memory retention, since it is during the sleep cycle that the brain processes information and stores it in a safe place for future recall.

Tip #2: Understand the Material

Many students attempt to “cram” before an exam, to no avail. The best way to improve retention for tests and exams is to create examples and situations where you are required to apply the theoretical, textbook knowledge you have gained. Understanding the material involves getting the information, breaking it down a basic level, and using it to launch into more situations and examples. To apply information is the hallmark of understanding.

Tip #3: Mnemonic Devices

Mnemonic devices are learning techniques that improve memory, and can be both verbal and visual. A good example of a mnemonic device is “ROY G. BIV,” where each letter in this mnemonic “name” represents the starting letter of a color of the rainbow: “Red Orange Yellow Green Blue Indigo Violet.” A student memorizing the Hebrew word “ka’rat” (meaning “to cut”) could use a mnemonic sentence: “I cut a karat,” (jewelry) and connect the Hebrew verb with its meaning (“to cut”). Mnemonic devices can go a long way in retaining material more efficiently, as opposed to cramming.

Tip #4: Relax (Don’t Stress)

Cramming oftentimes is a result of stress and nervousness. Just relax. Close your eyes, take a few deep breaths, and after a few minutes, breathing should return to normal. This small breathing exercise will allow the brain to calm down and work properly. If the student has studied the material diligently, he or she should remain calm so as to allow the brain to operate normally. Tensing up before an exam only restricts the brain’s informational output and leads to massive panic attack.

Tip #5: Eat Brain-Boosting Food

It is true that “You are what you eat.” In the same way that the body needs fuel, so does the brain. As with the body, the keep to both physical and mental fitness is to eat healthy foods. One healthy food to digest is omega-3s such as fish (salmon, trout, sardines) as well as walnuts, pumpkin seeds, and soybeans. Avoid foods loaded in saturated fat, such as red meats, whole milk, butter, cheese, sour cream, and ice cream. Digestion of foods high in saturated fat could increase chances of dementia and alzheimers. Next, eat more fruits and vegetables, foods high in antioxidants such as spinach, broccoli, romaine lettuce, apricots, mangos, and watermelon.

Tip #6: Exercise the Brain Muscle

As with anything else, if the brain is not exercised, memory loss will occur. Try to find intellectually-stimulating games and puzzles to engage the mind.  Sit and work on crossword puzzles to work the mind’s vocabulary. Read the newspaper to remain engaged with the community’s events while exercising the brain at the same time. These mental exercises and more may seem daunting at first, but research shows that such exercises done now will shield the mind from memory loss later.

Improving memory takes time, but with the above tips, you can be well on your way to a sharper memory in no time.

How to Become Teacher’s Pet

In a class of 100 to 200 students you may feel like just a number; however, there are some very specific things you can do to stand out from the crowd & touch that “Ahhh, my favorite student!” button in just about any teach. You may aptly call this article “What a Teacher Wants” because in it we’ll jump into the hearts and minds of he who is often seen as the enemy – your professor.

Now, in another life you might have learned how to kiss up to your school teachers. I want to take those seeds, add some Miracle Grow & help you harvest that coveted place in a college professor’s mind, which will be handy for more reasons than one.

First, as you probably have seen, teachers love it when they see kids excited to learn. They take guess from your behavior to help them determine this. Remember, actions speak louder than words, but that doesn’t mean that words don’t do any good. When you read before you go to class, prepare at least 3 good questions that show your teacher you’re interested in learning; and don’t cop out and take any study guide questions that show your teacher you’re not willing to look for the answers yourself. Come up with some of your own questions & always preface a question during or after class with what you already understand about the topic. This shows too that you’re willing to search.

Second, let’s get into some of those actions that speak louder than words. Being a little early & sitting up front shows your teacher that you take your learning seriously. Sitting up front also gives your professor a better look at you during class. For you, it keeps your attention on the lecture instead of on those. It’s a win/win. When you arrive early, pull out your notes from your reading & review them along with any questions you’ve prepared to ask the teacher during that period.

Third, as much as it pains me to say it (seeing as I had a hard time doing it myself) turn your assignments in earlier than expected. Some teachers will give you feedback if you do this, giving you the opportunity to tidy it up before its final due date. This is typically the case for papers, essays & project write-ups.

Fourth, you may not be a note taker, but scribbling down points the professor makes during lecture that help you understand the concept better is a healthy habit & preparation for teacher’s pet step 5.

Fifth, compliment & give positive feedback to a teacher this helps because teachers like to know that they’re making a difference. Begin by smiling and nodding your head when the teacher illuminates you in a helpful way. You may also take a moment after class (not too much, else you be perceived as insincere) occasionally to let them know that a certain method or way they said something really helped you understand the concept more fully.

So there you have it, five insights into a teacher’s mindset. Doing these will enliven both you and the educator. You’ll build a positive relationship with mutual respect which will give your professor a window into your mind & heart & be helpful if you stumble during the semester & need some special attention or considerations.

10 Essential Study Tips

Studying is defined by Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary as “a state of contemplation,” “application of the mind to the obtaining of knowledge,” or “a careful examination or analysis of a phenomenon, development, or question.” Studying in college is necessary if a student desires to excel academically. Provided below are ten significant tips to transform mental labor into academic success.

Establish a Routine

To apply the mind constantly to a task requires setting up a routine by which the task or challenge will be accomplished. A good routine to establish that aids in college preparation is to set aside a specific time of the day to study. If a student is more productive in study in the morning than during the day, he or she should study at a time where the mind will be most productive.

Create the Right Environment

A student can choose to study at a particular time of day, but still fail to do so because of a distracting environment. If a student is to get any studying done, he or she cannot have his or her attention turned away from the books because of the latest movie or newest game show. Turn the television off or decide to go in a room where there is no television or stereo system. Getting rid of atmospheric noise will free the mind to think, optimizing study performance.

Set It Down

Often, when students are busy, it never fails that at least one activity in the day will be neglected or completely forgotten. Placing the necessary time(s) of study on a personal calendar or in a personal planner helps the student juggle the many tasks that he or she has throughout the day as well as accomplish the studying goal. What is not planned cannot be performed.

Take Good Care of Yourself

Study time will not be a productive endeavor if the student does not maximize his or her health condition. To this end, the student should drink plenty of liquids, primarily water, and eat healthy foods (fruits and vegetables). The student should get plenty of rest at night, a minimum of eight hours of sleep a day. To stimulate the mind, create an exercise routine by which the mind can rest from study and process the material learned. When the body feels great, the mind will respond favorably.

Reward Yourself

After the work comes the reward. The student should find a way to reward himself or herself for productive study. Little rewards celebrate the past labor and anticipate the future reward.

Creativity in Study

The student should design his or her own test questions, daily answering questions regarding the material studied previously. This keeps studying alive as a journey while also boosting retention of the material previously learned.

Avoid Interruption

The student should have all notes with him or her before a study session begins to prevent interruption.

Test Yourself

The student should test himself or herself after studying to provide some tangible way of measuring academic progress. Students can ask their parents to test them, or rework old assignments and examples provided in their course textbooks, etc.

Don’t Panic

A student can easily be confident in his or her abilities until the day of the exam, when the student becomes fearful and then panics. Panicking may seem like a normal reaction, but it only clouds the mind and prevents the brain from retrieving the information stored in it.

Ask for Help

The student should always be willing to talk to professors and other classmates if he or she continues to struggle in an academic area or concept. Asking up front optimizes the chances of success, rather than waiting until the week or night before an examination.

Studying is hard work, but the reward will more than make up for the labor. One success is always the steppingstone upon which another comes.

How to Memorize Any List of Words, Part 2

 (Continued from Part 1 of How to Memorize Any List of Words)

As you begin your homework you notice a sledge hammer above your head. It’s the kind that one finds at an amusement park. Whack a target and watch your toughness thermometer rise. It occurs to you that this hammer represents the malice you felt when called away from your lovely gigantic cupcake. Just as quickly as you recognize what it is you see it poof into a cloud of dust and blow away. You no longer needed to hold any malice if your homework was going to be this exciting.

The wonders of math stream from the textbook’s golden rays directly into your brain. You can almost taste the glorious concepts it’s so tangible. You never knew math could be so amazingly fun. Just you feel something vibrate against your leg. Your cell phone! Someone’s calling you, so you reach into your pocket to pull the phone out of your pocket and something doesn’t seem right. The phone seems to be slippery, hard to grab. With a ruffled brow you look down at your phone, but it was a stick of butter vibrating. It still is. So you hold the greasy receiver up to your ear and answer with, “Thanks for calling my cell…er stick of butter rather…how can I help you?” You are pleased to hear the gingerbread man’s high pitched candy man voice. He proceeds to tell you that he spoke with your mother and worked his gingerbread magic. “She says you better get started on this cupcake if it’s ever to look like a pilgrim.”

“Awesome!” you exclaim, “I’m on my way down.”

“No need,” he replies and you see his head pop up from above the edge of your deroofed room. He smiles that big gingerbread smile as he reaches in to your room, closing the math textbook and lays down his hand for you to climb upon.

The day passes and you find yourself reflecting on the singularity of it all. Lying there in bed all the images of the day pass through your head, the large orange package, the gingerbread deliveryman & the cupcake. You smile as you recall your fantasy unfolding like a classroom map. Eating a pilgrim out of that huge thing? Too fun! You gloat at the thought of how fun math was from the special textbook. You’re happy that your mallet of malice dissolved and you can’t help but chuckle that your cell phone turned out to be a stick of butter. All of today’s events blend together in a symbol of your gratitude – the setting sun – that warms you as you fall asleep.

Brilliant! I’m sure you will remember that list of words without much effort. The same thing can be done with lists of 20 or more. World record holder Dave Farrow says the key to memorization is to pick images that will trigger memory. Each brain has at least one of five natural triggers: action, exaggeration, oddity, personal and fantastical. Using what works best for you will give your memory the ability to take leaps and bounds. The odd associations and vivid pictures you create will speak to the right side of your brain, tap into your emotions and help you remember words and concepts better.

How to Memorize Any List of Words, Part 1

I want to teach you a fun way to remember groups of words such as grocery lists or sets of vocabulary words. The underlying principle here is that the mind works in pictures, so a really good way to remember a group of words is to associate them with a picture in your mind. And just so you know the more outrageous the better. 🙂

Take this list of 10 words: package, gingerbread man, cupcake, fantasy, pilgrim, textbook, malice, cell phone, butter stick, gratitude. Now, as I give you an image to associate with each word I want you to close your eyes and picture it before moving onto the next one. It may help to have another person read it to you. Ready? Alright, here we go.

Picture a large orange package that is sitting in your front yard. I’m talking a package so big that you wonder if there’s not another house in it. Just as you’re puzzling over how it got there and what’s in it you see a giant gingerbread man step out from behind the box. He smiles at you and waves. Wow! Weird! “Well?” he says, “aren’t you going to open it? This is all too strange to ask questions, so you take the rope he is extending to you and give it hard tug. Instantly, the sides of the large package fall to the ground revealing on large cupcake. Your favorite! The, as if a movie real opened up in the sky you see your childhood fantasy unfold before you. It’s of you eating away at a giant cupcake until it resembles the face of a pilgrim. Sure it’s odd, but what fantasy doesn’t have a tinge of oddity in it?

You smile with excitement, but just then the fantasy rolls up like a wall map in the classroom as you hear your mother call you to come do your homework. Sadly, you wave goodbye to the gingerbread man & his wonderfully intuitive present. Shoulders slumped you head upstairs to your bedroom to do your math assignment. When you open your door, to your surprise, the roof that once kept you dry on rainy nights was no longer there. In the space that opened your bedroom to the outside world floated a glowing math textbook. From its opened pages stream banner of golden light & somersaulting numbers, graphs and shapes. Perhaps you brought the wrong textbook home, but either way, homework tonight definitely won’t be dull, that’s for sure!

Continued in Part 2 of How to Memorize Any List of Words.